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#OSCON 2015 and the Rise of Open Source Offices

I had a fantastic time at OSCON last week. It was a crazy busy week for Twitter announcing that we are helping form the Cloud Native Computing Foundation and unifying some of the work that has been going on in the Kubernetes and Mesos ecosystems:

It’s rare that you see two communities and the large companies behind them put their egos besides and do what is better for everyone in the long term in the infrastructure space. We also formally joined the Open Container Initiative and plan on donating an AppC C++ implementation in the future:

Thank you to everyone who came to our ping pong tournament party and learned a bit more about the sport of table tennis:

We also had a great @TODOGroup panel at OSCON discussing how different companies are running and establishing open source offices… along with what works and some lessons learned:

Finally, thank you to everyone who came to my talk about lessons learned from Twitter creating its open source office on Thursday:

It’s always amazing to see how many companies are starting to form open source offices, from my talk I tried to highlight some of the better known ones from larger companies and even startups (along with their mission statements):

I really expect this trend to continue in the future, for example Box is looking to hire their first Head of Open Source and even  Guy Martin was just hired to create and run an open source office at Autodesk… Autodesk!

At the end of the day, as more businesses become software companies to some nature, they will naturally depend on a plethora of open source software. Businesses will look to find ways to build better relationships with the open source communities their software depends on to maximize value for their business, it’s in their best interests.

Capt’n Karls: Pedernales Falls 2015

Last weekend, I had a lot of fun running in my favorite trail running series of the year: Capt’n Karl’s. The first race of four is in Pedernales Falls State Park which is just a beautiful part of the Texas hill country:

The scenery was beautiful minus having to run through some deep pockets of water and what seemed to be a river… my shoes were filthy afterwards! I opted to do the 10km this time around and finished in a decent time of 48:28 running about a 7:41 pace:

I even managed to get 5th place overall which came as a surprise since I wasn’t running as hard as I could be. I guess all the pros were running the 30k and 60k :)

Looking forward to the next race in Muleshoe Bend on July 18th, I’ll try harder this time around and see if I can crack the top 3 :)

MesosCon 2015 Keynotes and Lightning Talk CFP

Holy it’s July already!

Last year I helped organized the first MesosCon community conference and we’re doing the same this year with a slightly larger Program Committee (thankfully, organizing conferences is so under appreciated in the tech industry).

Recently we announced the schedule and some of the keynote speakers for MesosCon 2015. On top of an amazing program, we’re excited to have a bunch of keynote speakers with @benh, @neha, @kenowens12, @adrianco and more.

 

Honestly, it’s been great to watch the Mesos community grow over the years, from its humble beginnings at Twitter to Apple announcing their adoption to seeing a plethora of other companies using it within their infrastructure.

What’s also fun at MesosCon is that we’re co-locating it with LinuxCon and ContainerCon in Seattle so you have the opportunity to attend those events too if they are of interest.

Also, if you’re interested, the lightning talk CFP is open until July 14th.

Hope to see you there! In my opinion, there really is no better set of events if you’re interested in seeing how the future of infrastructure will be run, along with having the opportunity to shape that direction.

Eclipse Code of Conduct

At the recent Eclipse Foundation board meeting this week in Toulouse as part of EclipseCon France, the committer representatives helped move forward a code of conduct for the Eclipse community. As for a bit of background, the request for this initially came from bugzilla and also the LocationTech working group which was looking for a code of conduct for its community. The board opted for a simple code of conduct based on the Contributor Convenant, see this email from Mike Milinkovich:

I am very pleased to announce that the Eclipse Foundation Board of Directors approved a Community Code of Conduct[1] at their meeting earlier this week at EclipseCon France. This brings the Eclipse community in line with the best practices for open source communities around the world.

Our community already has a strong culture of respect and professionalism. Neither I nor the Board expect anyone’s behaviour to change as a result of this. This is simply codifying the high expectations we already meet in terms of professionalism, respect, and simply courtesy.

I agree with Mike and couldn’t have said it better, we have a great community and this simply codifies our high expectations.

SourceForge Hijacking Open Source Project Downloads

Today I read about how SourceForge is hijacking nmap downloads through their old SourceForge account…

This is just plain naughty behavior in open source land… SourceForge has previously done this with the GIMP project and inserted adware into the download. They even created a response page based on the criticism from that incident stating that:

This is a 100% opt-in program for the developer, and we want to reassure you that we will NEVER bundle offers with any project without the developers consent.

Outside of this just being dubious behavior, this looks to be a lie based on what the  nmap developers have stated. Also, what is concerning is that who knows what other open source projects SourceForge is trying to do this for.

This should be a lesson and even a wake up call to open source projects who use external services like SourceForge… there’s inherent risk if the tide of the business you depend on changes.

Furthermore, this is another reason hosting your project at a quality open source foundation can be beneficial as they generally won’t do these type of shenanigans as they protect your projects best interests. These open source foundations can also help you secure a trademark for your project which can help fight against these types of issues.

Stay diligent!

UPDATE: A response from SourceForge

@RogueRunning Trail Series 2015: The Ranch

Last Sunday, I had the opportunity to finish the Rogue Trail Series at the beautiful (but a little muddy from all the rain) Reveille Peak Ranch:

I finished in 02:58:58 with the first two 10K laps taking about 54 minutes each and the final painful lap taking about 70 minutes. I ended up fighting some stomach issues in the last few miles and just couldn’t keep my pace in check (hey it happens).

In the series, I finished 10th overall with a cumulative time of 08:26:23 which I’m happy with, definitely not my best but I’m getting back in the swing of things.

Next up is my favorite trail series of the year… Capt’n Karls! Nothing more fun than running races in the dark with your headlamp, who doesn’t love 7pm start times?

Protip: Airline Customer Service via Twitter DMs

Here’s a secret for those of you who travel a lot like me for business. Some airlines have fantastic customer service via Twitter Direct Messages (DMs), even better than using the phone for most issues in my experience!

Over the past several months, @AmericanAir has been a pleasure to work with over Twitter DMs for when travel issues unfortunately happened. I’ve shared this little secret with friends and they had similar success with other airlines like @VirginAmerica and @Jetblue, especially when phone wait times were atrocious. Also, I’m definitely not the only one who has noticed this.

In the end, I hope more airlines and businesses follow this customer service model, or at least offer it as an option. For most issues, it’s usually simpler to deal with things over direct message (text) than having to interact with someone over the phone, especially when you’re on the go. I even see a future where you can even automate most of these interactions so you may not need a human being for a good portion of customer service requests.

Anyways, happy and safe travels!

@ApacheParquet Graduating and Mesos with Siri

The last week for me has been fun in open source land outside of me getting two of my wisdom teeth pulled out of my face. On the bright side, I have some pain killers now and also, two notable things happened. First it was nice to finally graduate Parquet out of the Apache Incubator:

It’s been a little over two years since we (Twitter) announced the open source columnar storage project with Cloudera. It’s a great feeling to see a plan come together and see this project grow over the years with 60+ contributors while hitting the notable achievement of graduating out of the Apache incubator gauntlet. If there’s any lesson here for me, it’s much easier to build an open source community when you do it an independent fashion with at least someone else in the beginning (thanks Cloudera).

Another notable thing that happened was that Apple finally announced that they are using Mesos to power Siri’s massive infrastructure.

In my experience of building open source communities, there are usually your public adopters and private adopters. There are companies that wish to remain private about the software they use at times and that’s fine, it’s understandable when it can be viewed as a competitive advantage. The challenge is how you work with these private adopters when they use an open source project of yours while wanting to collaborate behind the scenes.

Anyways, it’s a great feeling to see Apple opening up a bit about their infrastructure and open source usage after working with them for awhile. Hopefully this is a sign of things to come from them. Also, it would be nice if Apple just updated Siri so when you ask what Mesos is, it replies with a funny response and proclaims her love of open source infrastructure technology.

Overall, it’s been a great last week.

@RogueRunning Trail Series 2015: The Tangle

This morning I had the opportunity to take part in The Tangle 30km:

Besides getting rained on a couple times, it was a beautiful run in the hill country. It was my first time at Flat Creek Crossing Ranch and I enjoyed the wide open terrain and even a cave on the course. Time wise, I ended up finishing in about 2:43 which isn’t fantastic but I’ll take it given the course was challenging and new to me. I’ll be better equipped next year.

Anyways, next up is the last race of the series, Reveille Peak!

Hells Hills 25K

Yesterday, I had the pleasure of running the Hells Hills 25K in Smithville, TX

It was a beautiful course and I averaged 8:54 min/mi.

Next up, the Tangle 30km trail race.