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Callisto Bootcamp Thoughts

So, after Wayne (maybe I should mention Swing so I get more hits also) emailed me a few days ago about the bootcamp for comments, I have given it some thought on how I would present the projects in Callisto. I have this thing where I like to show how projects use each other (a little cross-pollination). I would breakup the bootcamp into three parts. The first part would be with what I call, the “core” projects: Platform (JDT, PDE…) and CDT. It would be nice to show the diversity of the Eclipse platform by demonstrating that you can work with Java as well with C/C++ (language agnostic). Maybe Doug can import the Mozilla code as part of the CDT module πŸ™‚

The next part for me would be to show off GEF, EMF and GMF (in that order). I’ll refer to these as the “core frameworks.” I would start with a simple shapes example in GEF. After people had a taste of GEF, I would bring out EMF and whip out a simple shapes model. To top it off, I would demo GMF by taking the model created in the EMF module and use GMF to generate a graphical editor (so we can come full-circle). The important thing to note here is that GMF takes advantage of both GEF and EMF.

To finish our Callisto adventure, we could dabble with VEP, DTP, WTP, BIRT, TPTP (in that order). Start out with VEP, showing off some eye-candy (mention that it uses EMF for its core models). DTP would be demo’d, I’d create a database using Derby, do some queries on it… The next step would be to create a web app using WTP that takes advantage of the database created using DTP. Then BIRT would be next to show off some of Eclipse’s reporting capabilities using the aforementioned database. (mention the usage of EMF/GEF by BIRT). Finally, TPTP would be demo’d by profiling a java application and then generating some interesting reports (mention the BIRT integration in TPTP, TPTP also uses EMF for its core models).

So, those are my thoughts… comments :o?

  • Bull

    If you ask anyone about eclipse, they will most likely tell you it is a great java IDE. A lot of people miss the point about OSGi and RCP! I gave a talk last week to a bunch of skilled Eclipse developers (most of them have written plugins, using EMF, GEF, etc…), but there were some new comers too. I started with OSGi and RCP and everyone said they learned a lot from this. (I used examples I saw in one of wayne’s talks). I think showing RCP really drives home the point that all these plugins are not just for Java IDEs.

    Cheers,
    Ian

  • Bull

    If you ask anyone about eclipse, they will most likely tell you it is a great java IDE. A lot of people miss the point about OSGi and RCP! I gave a talk last week to a bunch of skilled Eclipse developers (most of them have written plugins, using EMF, GEF, etc…), but there were some new comers too. I started with OSGi and RCP and everyone said they learned a lot from this. (I used examples I saw in one of wayne’s talks). I think showing RCP really drives home the point that all these plugins are not just for Java IDEs.Cheers,Ian

  • zx

    Ian, that’s the hardest part about Eclipse and I was leaving it out of the talk (unless someone wants to spend time discussing it in the “Platform” piece). I was going to leave it to someone like Wayne to discuss the importance of RCP and assumed people would know about basic RCP/OSGi

    Oh well, I’m sure the “Platform” module could be defined to talk about OSGi & RCP a bit πŸ˜‰

    Thanks for the feedback πŸ˜€

  • zx

    Ian, that’s the hardest part about Eclipse and I was leaving it out of the talk (unless someone wants to spend time discussing it in the “Platform” piece). I was going to leave it to someone like Wayne to discuss the importance of RCP and assumed people would know about basic RCP/OSGiOh well, I’m sure the “Platform” module could be defined to talk about OSGi & RCP a bit ;)Thanks for the feedback πŸ˜€

  • Wayne

    You’re hired.

  • Wayne

    You’re hired.