Twitter github

Eclipse Student Project Ideas

I will be working with UCLA‘s wonderful software engineering class again this year where they emphasize student projects. The class usually entails different companies (Google, IBM, etc…) or open source projects (Wine, Eclipse, etc…) coming in and presenting an overview of the project and some project ideas that the students can mull over. This allows the students to work on cool things and learn about software engineering at the same time!

Last year, the students didn’t listen to any of my suggestions (just like in real world software engineering projects!) and decided to go with a MIPS/SPIM IDE 🙂 This year, after I give the typical Eclipse schpiel, I want to entice them with some exciting (yet doable) project ideas. For the committers out there, do you have any tasks within your projects that students could do? For others, do you have any ideas that students relatively new to Eclipse can handle?

In anticipation of this year’s Google Summer of Code, I have started a wiki page to list some student project ideas. I encourage committers and community members to post ideas there 🙂

By the way, if anyone is in the LA area on January 10th and wants to discuss Eclipse / open-source over a couple of drinks, let me know 🙂

  • Bull

    This is really interesting. One of the professors at UVic taught a course at UBC in which the students basically learned software engineering through a number of Eclipse projects (including several of your favorite like GEF). I wonder if we (Eclipse) can / should start to collect some of this information and make it available through some sort of wiki page. I think Eclipse as a course makes a very powerful learning tool.

  • Bull

    This is really interesting. One of the professors at UVic taught a course at UBC in which the students basically learned software engineering through a number of Eclipse projects (including several of your favorite like GEF). I wonder if we (Eclipse) can / should start to collect some of this information and make it available through some sort of wiki page. I think Eclipse as a course makes a very powerful learning tool.

  • Shahan Khatchadourian

    The project ideas posted on the wiki page are very interesting. My first steps into Eclipse plug-in development were in Oct 06 with Ian Bull’s (the previous commenter) very useful Zest framework. XSummary was developed based on graduate research to visualize the structure of an XML document collection as a summary (finding common/important elements). It was developed in around 2 weeks, was smelly(the code!) and had a lot of late nights. The completed app resulted in a lot of positive feedback encouraging me to examine more of Eclipse’s features and extensibility for use in my own student project for the last few months called VisTopK: Visualization of Top-k Information Retrieval Algorithms, which is now complete. It’s an Eclipse plug-in based on GEF and Apache Lucene allowing a user to navigate through a threshold algorithm in a temporal manner (some info on my blog, and more will be posted later). It was an extremely fun and rewarding experience to learn about the internals of Eclipse and I will continue to dwelve into it due to the learning experience gained with unit-testing, package management, recognized software patterns, and more…

  • Shahan Khatchadourian

    The project ideas posted on the wiki page are very interesting. My first steps into Eclipse plug-in development were in Oct 06 with Ian Bull’s (the previous commenter) very useful Zest framework. XSummary was developed based on graduate research to visualize the structure of an XML document collection as a summary (finding common/important elements). It was developed in around 2 weeks, was smelly(the code!) and had a lot of late nights. The completed app resulted in a lot of positive feedback encouraging me to examine more of Eclipse’s features and extensibility for use in my own student project for the last few months called VisTopK: Visualization of Top-k Information Retrieval Algorithms, which is now complete. It’s an Eclipse plug-in based on GEF and Apache Lucene allowing a user to navigate through a threshold algorithm in a temporal manner (some info on my blog, and more will be posted later). It was an extremely fun and rewarding experience to learn about the internals of Eclipse and I will continue to dwelve into it due to the learning experience gained with unit-testing, package management, recognized software patterns, and more…