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Roaming Committers

In reply to Pascal’s recent blog post committers roaming together, I thought this would be a nice time to tell the Eclipse community about IRC again. A popular venue in the open-source world to chat about things and roam is IRC. In Eclipse, we have #eclipse where users come to ask questions about their Eclipse problems, #eclipse-dev where committers hang out, and various other channels specific to projects. What I would like to see is more adoption of IRC by committers. It would be nice to say go in the #eclipse-dtp channel and find DTP committers and ask them about a problem or why they do something a certain way.

Come on guys, IRC isn’t like Gopher which went out of style in the 90’s… give it a try.

  • Scott Lewis

    ECF project
    has an IRC client that runs in Eclipse. Download here.

  • Scott Lewis

    ECF project has an IRC client that runs in Eclipse. Download here.

  • AlBlue

    What’s really annoying is that almost all companies are behind firewalls that can’t participate in IRC. There also may be systems that can’t work on other ports (e.g. NNTP) either.

    Of course, if you actually ran in a company which blocked these ports you can be damn sure it would get solved. But instead, you run things from an open network and then can’t understand why others can’t join in. It’s exactly the same with anonymous connections to CVS; direct connections to 22 aren’t allowed by most companies. If you use an HTTP proxy, the CONNECT command of most commercial HTTP proxies only allows destination connections to port 443, so you can’t use that either.

    Tools like Jabber work over HTTP natively, and web-based interfaces to newsgroups are possible; but these all seem to be eschewed by the Eclipse Foundation. If the Eclipse Foundation is really about getting people interested in joining in, how about using protocols that can be connected to from corporate networks?

  • AlBlue

    What’s really annoying is that almost all companies are behind firewalls that can’t participate in IRC. There also may be systems that can’t work on other ports (e.g. NNTP) either.Of course, if you actually ran in a company which blocked these ports you can be damn sure it would get solved. But instead, you run things from an open network and then can’t understand why others can’t join in. It’s exactly the same with anonymous connections to CVS; direct connections to 22 aren’t allowed by most companies. If you use an HTTP proxy, the CONNECT command of most commercial HTTP proxies only allows destination connections to port 443, so you can’t use that either.Tools like Jabber work over HTTP natively, and web-based interfaces to newsgroups are possible; but these all seem to be eschewed by the Eclipse Foundation. If the Eclipse Foundation is really about getting people interested in joining in, how about using protocols that can be connected to from corporate networks?

  • Anonymous

    “Almost all?”

    “Most companies?”

    Can you support these statements?

    Generally, my employers have made no issue of these things and although I don’t disagree that some less enlightened companies act as you describe I think you overstate the problem.

    You would have greater credibility and effectiveness if you tempered some of your less well-founded opinions. I say this as a grateful beneficiary of some of your other writings but one who has observed your dramatic overstatements rubbing people the wrong way on occasion. The solo head-on approach is generally not the most effective tactic in open source software development and community building.

  • Anonymous

    “Almost all?””Most companies?”Can you support these statements?Generally, my employers have made no issue of these things and although I don’t disagree that some less enlightened companies act as you describe I think you overstate the problem.You would have greater credibility and effectiveness if you tempered some of your less well-founded opinions. I say this as a grateful beneficiary of some of your other writings but one who has observed your dramatic overstatements rubbing people the wrong way on occasion. The solo head-on approach is generally not the most effective tactic in open source software development and community building.

  • Chris Aniszczyk (zx)

    is that you earl hofert?

  • Chris Aniszczyk (zx)

    is that you earl hofert?