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Imitation is a form of flattery…

Some people say imitation is some form of flattery. In the software industry (especially in open-source), we see this a lot when people prune ideas and code from projects. Is this a bad thing? Not necessarily… it could be if we keep repeating the same mistakes. I came across a recent example of “imitation” in the Eclipse ecosystem as I was messing with JavaScript a bit (using the JSDT) and noticed something familiar:

I’ve seen those preferences before in the JDT!

I than did a bit more investigation… I looked into what extension points are provided by JSDT:

I think I’ve seen those before too!

I think the JDT team should be flattered, right ;)?

I’m not sure yet if “imitation is the sincerest form of flattery,” but I know being stalked and copied can indeed be frightening:

  • Michael Spector

    You just woke up, man 🙂
    There are plenty of Eclipse projects, that just copy JDT’s code without feeling any pangs of conscience. JDT seems to have the very correct view of how IDE for specific language has to be implemented, but the problem is that it was not designed in a framework style. BTW, it’s not an easy task to produce such a framework for all languages’ types, but DLTK seems to succeed in that for dynamic languages, again, by copying parts of JDT that are common for most languages, and packing it in a toolkit/framework cover.

  • Michael Spector

    You just woke up, man :)There are plenty of Eclipse projects, that just copy JDT’s code without feeling any pangs of conscience. JDT seems to have the very correct view of how IDE for specific language has to be implemented, but the problem is that it was not designed in a framework style. BTW, it’s not an easy task to produce such a framework for all languages’ types, but DLTK seems to succeed in that for dynamic languages, again, by copying parts of JDT that are common for most languages, and packing it in a toolkit/framework cover.