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I want my HelloWorld

Sometimes during my “Eclipse newsgroup altruism time,” I stumble upon things that make it worth it:

  • Anonymous

    This was the funniest thing I’ve ever read. But I think you should obscure the person’s name and e-mail.

  • Anonymous

    This was the funniest thing I’ve ever read. But I think you should obscure the person’s name and e-mail.

  • Chris Aniszczyk (zx)

    It’s in a public forum (i.e., the Eclipse newsgroups) so I didn’t bother. I even tried to reply 😉

  • Chris Aniszczyk (zx)

    It’s in a public forum (i.e., the Eclipse newsgroups) so I didn’t bother. I even tried to reply 😉

  • Nikos

    lol Chris,

    your reply is sweet 🙂

    But she’s right :
    no “Hello world !” just a blank window, it’s confusing 🙂

  • Nikos

    lol Chris,your reply is sweet :)But she’s right :no “Hello world !” just a blank window, it’s confusing 🙂

  • Anonymous

    Let me get this straight. Someone points out a bug. You can:
    a) log it;
    b) fix it yourself;
    c) tell the user that it’s not a bug;
    d) go tell them to read instructions.

    I’d say that the correct answer is either a or b. Once in a while I get a developer who would rather argue that a bug is not a bug than have it fixed. (And by the way, if a “Hello, world” example does not print “hello, world”, that’s a bug. Ether the sample needs to be renamed, or code needs to be fixed.)

    Until now, I never even considered (d) a real option. Why shoud SHE go read the documentation? She can execute the program fine. The bug is not going to go away if she reads some documentation. SHE is going to go away, because she reported a problem, and no one cared.

    See this post from Dennis and Karl for inspiration:

    http://dev.eclipse.org/blogs/eclipsewebmaster/2008/11/25/why-users-dont-bother-to-file-bug-reports/

  • Anonymous

    Let me get this straight. Someone points out a bug. You can:a) log it;b) fix it yourself;c) tell the user that it’s not a bug;d) go tell them to read instructions.I’d say that the correct answer is either a or b. Once in a while I get a developer who would rather argue that a bug is not a bug than have it fixed. (And by the way, if a “Hello, world” example does not print “hello, world”, that’s a bug. Ether the sample needs to be renamed, or code needs to be fixed.)Until now, I never even considered (d) a real option. Why shoud SHE go read the documentation? She can execute the program fine. The bug is not going to go away if she reads some documentation. SHE is going to go away, because she reported a problem, and no one cared.See this post from Dennis and Karl for inspiration:http://dev.eclipse.org/blogs/eclipsewebmaster/2008/11/25/why-users-dont-bother-to-file-bug-reports/

  • Chris Aniszczyk (zx)

    Clearly you have no sense of humor Mr. Anonymous 🙂

    We have no sense of the problem as she wasn’t able to explain the problem well. What she really needed to do is read “How To Ask Questions The Smart Way

    I have a feeling like Nikos said, it came up as a blank window and she thought it may have been something else.

  • Chris Aniszczyk (zx)

    Clearly you have no sense of humor Mr. Anonymous :)We have no sense of the problem as she wasn’t able to explain the problem well. What she really needed to do is read “How To Ask Questions The Smart Way“I have a feeling like Nikos said, it came up as a blank window and she thought it may have been something else.

  • Anonymous

    “I see no HelloWorld.” – sounds like the problem is pretty clear to me.

    A beginning user is confused. She takes the time to post on the forum about her confusion.

    Now, let’s pretend that we want to make Eclipse easier and less confusing for newcomers. I know, some of us might think that it is plenty easy to use as is, and if it isn’t for some newbie, then the said newbie simply does not deserve THE KNOWLEDGE. But let’s just PRETEND that we want to make Eclipse less confusing for a second.

    So, what do you do?

    a) Remove the confusion. (Add comments, rename the example, change the code, whatever.)

    b) Explain the situation to this one newbie, so that they are less confused.

    c) Send them to a page with 154 links without any clear instruction on which link applies, why they should click it or what they should look for.

    d) Realize the hilarity of the question and post it on your blog, so that we all can laugh at the stupid newbie who can’t even speak English.

    The answer is clearly (d). I mean, look at this stuff: “You have HelloWorld example. I see no HelloWorld.” What does she even mean??? This is beter than SNL. Hold me, people, I am ROFL.

  • Anonymous

    “I see no HelloWorld.” – sounds like the problem is pretty clear to me. A beginning user is confused. She takes the time to post on the forum about her confusion. Now, let’s pretend that we want to make Eclipse easier and less confusing for newcomers. I know, some of us might think that it is plenty easy to use as is, and if it isn’t for some newbie, then the said newbie simply does not deserve THE KNOWLEDGE. But let’s just PRETEND that we want to make Eclipse less confusing for a second.So, what do you do?a) Remove the confusion. (Add comments, rename the example, change the code, whatever.)b) Explain the situation to this one newbie, so that they are less confused.c) Send them to a page with 154 links without any clear instruction on which link applies, why they should click it or what they should look for.d) Realize the hilarity of the question and post it on your blog, so that we all can laugh at the stupid newbie who can’t even speak English. The answer is clearly (d). I mean, look at this stuff: “You have HelloWorld example. I see no HelloWorld.” What does she even mean??? This is beter than SNL. Hold me, people, I am ROFL.

  • Chris Aniszczyk (zx)

    I don’t know how the SWT team could do better than what they have currently for their snippets. Furthermore, I replied with information but she didn’t reply… so we can assume she got things working finally and didn’t tell us… or she left the Eclipse community in despair because she couldn’t get the example working. Communication works two-ways… especially in a community support forum where no-one gets paid to answer questions.

    There’s clear, concise instructions on how to set things up and even where to report bugs.

    Anonymous, you should come out of hiding.

  • Chris Aniszczyk (zx)

    I don’t know how the SWT team could do better than what they have currently for their snippets. Furthermore, I replied with information but she didn’t reply… so we can assume she got things working finally and didn’t tell us… or she left the Eclipse community in despair because she couldn’t get the example working. Communication works two-ways… especially in a community support forum where no-one gets paid to answer questions.There’s clear, concise instructions on how to set things up and even where to report bugs.Anonymous, you should come out of hiding.

  • Anonymous

    > I don't know how the SWT team could do better

    They could have the "HelloWorld" example display "Hello, world!".

    Or they could rename the HellowWorld snippet to "Blank window" snippet.

  • Anonymous

    > I don't know how the SWT team could do betterThey could have the "HelloWorld" example display "Hello, world!". Or they could rename the HellowWorld snippet to "Blank window" snippet.