Twitter github

Welcome to the Open Source Club IntelliJ

It looks like Jetbrains just announced that they are releasing a free and open sourced version of IntelliJ under the APL 2.0 license. Cool beans, however, open sourcing an IDE is just the first step…

Throw Cow over the Fence

The hard part is building a sustainable community. To channel Tim O’ Reilly,

…what really distinguishes open source is not just source, but an architecture of participation that includes low barriers to entry by newcomers, and some mechanism for isolating the cathedral from the bazaar. This architecture of participation allows for a real free market of ideas, in which anyone can put forward a proposed solution to a problem; it becomes adopted, if at all, by acclamation and the organic spread of its usefulness.

Let’s hope that IntelliJ isn’t just throwing the source over the fence and expecting magic to happen.

Good luck to IntelliJ creating that architecture of participation.

  • Very good. Now we have three excellent open source IDE’s!

  • Very good. Now we have three excellent open source IDE’s!

  • Interestingly enough I found the following in the libs directory:

    org.eclipse.jdt.core_3.4.4.v_894_R34x.jar

    Who knew?

  • Interestingly enough I found the following in the libs directory:

    org.eclipse.jdt.core_3.4.4.v_894_R34x.jar

    Who knew?

  • It’s a bit weird having JDT Core… I know people use the JDT Compiler in a variety of settings these days.

  • It’s a bit weird having JDT Core… I know people use the JDT Compiler in a variety of settings these days.

  • @Chris Aniszczyk
    If you take a look in the ServiceMix 4 bundle o’ stuff you’ll find JDT core too – people use that for weird shit like compiling JSPs on the fly. As if JSPs were still popular, or somethin’!

  • @Chris Aniszczyk
    If you take a look in the ServiceMix 4 bundle o’ stuff you’ll find JDT core too – people use that for weird shit like compiling JSPs on the fly. As if JSPs were still popular, or somethin’!

  • @Manuel Woelker

    A lot of people knew. The following was posted in 2006:

    http://blogs.zdnet.com/Burnette/?p=5

    Best,
    Ismael

  • @Manuel Woelker

    A lot of people knew. The following was posted in 2006:

    http://blogs.zdnet.com/Burnette/?p=5

    Best,
    Ismael

  • Daniel Beck

    Intellij ist really a good Java IDE. 6 years ago, I used it exclusively, however I switched to Eclipse, even if Eclipse was not nearly as good as Intellij, because it is open-source.

    Siy years later, Eclipse is a much better and faster IDE. Code completion is fast and great. The platform (e.g. RCP) is great. What however really annoys me it the support for enterprise application, which is still not good; WTPs user interface is confusing, and slow. Support for Maven is still very bad.

    Intellij has excellent enterprise application support and is the best IDE for scripting language like ruby and groovy, however all there excellent plugins are still closed source. That’s why I will continue to use eclipse, and hope that ever WTP becomes better, or that Intellij frees their JEE-Plugins.

  • Daniel Beck

    Intellij ist really a good Java IDE. 6 years ago, I used it exclusively, however I switched to Eclipse, even if Eclipse was not nearly as good as Intellij, because it is open-source.

    Siy years later, Eclipse is a much better and faster IDE. Code completion is fast and great. The platform (e.g. RCP) is great. What however really annoys me it the support for enterprise application, which is still not good; WTPs user interface is confusing, and slow. Support for Maven is still very bad.

    Intellij has excellent enterprise application support and is the best IDE for scripting language like ruby and groovy, however all there excellent plugins are still closed source. That’s why I will continue to use eclipse, and hope that ever WTP becomes better, or that Intellij frees their JEE-Plugins.

  • At first glance, the quote from Tim O’Reilly sounds like Democracy, the best of, or may be Democracy 2.0 (with the appareance of Internet).
    One instance of an architecture of participation being, for example, the election campaign +process.

  • At first glance, the quote from Tim O’Reilly sounds like Democracy, the best of, or may be Democracy 2.0 (with the appareance of Internet).
    One instance of an architecture of participation being, for example, the election campaign +process.