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Cloud Native Computing Foundation 2 Years Later

A little over two years ago after five years of service at Twitter, I took the opportunity to build an open source foundation from scratch using some of the computing techniques we experimented with at Twitter:

I was initially excited about the idea because of my experience with open source foundations in previous lives, from being involved with the Eclipse Foundation, Linux Foundation, Apache Foundation plus part of the early discussions around OpenStack governance formation. I viewed this as an opportunity to learn from the lessons of other foundations and do something new and modern in the GitHub era, along with of course making our own mistakes. You really don’t get many opportunities¬†to start an open source foundation from scratch that will impact the whole industry.

Stepping back, the original idea behind the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) was to promote a method of computing (we call it cloud native) pioneered by internet scale giants such as Google, Twitter, Facebook and so on and bring it to the rest of the industry. If you looked inside these companies, you can see they were running services at scale, packaged in containers, orchestrated by some central system.

The first mission was to provide a neutral home for Kubernetes as the seed project of the foundation but also provide room for adjacent projects that specialized in specific areas for this new world (think monitoring and tracing as an example). The second mission was to convince all the major cloud providers to build in Kubernetes as a managed offering so we could essentially have a “POSIX of the cloud” that would give us a set of distributed APIs that would work everywhere (including on premise). Last week with AWS announcing their managed offering EKS, we have accomplished this goal with every major cloud provider supporting Kubernetes natively, kubernetes is truly the lingua franca of the cloud.

We still have a long way to go within CNCF to truly making cloud native computing ubiquitous across the industry, but I’m excited to see so many companies and individuals come together under CNCF to make this happen, especially as we have our largest annual gathering this week, KubeCon/CloudNativeCon. Personally, I’m nothing but thrilled to what the future holds and truly lucky to be serving our community under the auspices of the foundation.

A special thank you to Craig McLuckie, Sarah Novotony, Todd Moore, Ken Owens, Peixin Hou, Doug Davis, Jeffrey Borek, Jonathan Donaldson, Carl Trieloff, Chris Wright and many other folks that were at that CNCF first board meeting two years ago bootstrapping the foundation.

Top 6 Public Cloud Providers in CNCF

Last week, I had the pleasure of welcoming Oracle into the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). This now marks the top 6 leading public cloud providers in the world are now part of the CNCF:

This also marks for the first time in the history of our industry that these leading cloud providers are working together in the same open source focused foundation to move the state of the art infrastructure forward.

Also last week I had the opportunity to bring in two new high quality cloud native projects into CNCF. Envoy is a high-performance open source edge and service proxy that makes the network transparent to applications. Jaeger is an open source distributed tracing system inspired by Google Dapper paper and OpenZipkin community. It can be used for tracing microservice-based architectures. Uber began deploying Jaeger internally in 2015. It is now integrated into thousands of microservices and recording thousands of traces every second.

 

Anyways, this is one of the reasons I enjoy working in open source today, bringing together diverse (and even competing) companies to build a better world by collaborating in the open!

AWS Joining CNCF

It’s been a little over a year and a half since I started to help build the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) from scratch. One of our original goals was to build a modern open source foundation focused on a new form of cloud computing called “cloud native” (essentially think of microservices that run in containers that are orchestrated) and to get all the major cloud providers at the table to adopt this form of computing.

Last week, we were happy to welcome AWS to CNCF as a member and that now brings us to having the top five cloud providers in the world at the table committing to adopting and promoting cloud native computing:

First off,¬†it’s always great to see an original vision of when we started CNCF come into reality, you can read more from¬†Adrian Cockcroft¬†why they decided to join CNCF and support cloud native computing.

Second, I think it’s great to see a company like Amazon expanding its open source efforts as they where one of the last large companies without a formal open source program. They recently started an official open source program office @AWSOpen under the leadership of Adrian Cockroft and Zaheda Borat and it’s been great to have them participate in the TODO Group too!

Anyways, always great to see large and impactful companies increase their commitment to open source. Now it’s interesting to think what large companies out there don’t have an official open source program or strategy (I’ll leave this as an exercise to the reader).

Become a Founding Kubernetes Certified Service Provider

In early September, CNCF will be announcing the founding class of Kubernetes Certified Service Providers (KCSPs). If your company provides professional services to support Kubernetes deployments, please consider signing up to become part of the founding class.

The main benefits of becoming a KCSP are:

  • Placement in a new section at the top of¬†https://kubernetes.io/partners/
  • Monthly meetings with cloud native project leaders, TOC members,
    and representatives from the CNCF Governing Board
  • Access to leads from end users looking for support

Requirements are:

  • Three or more engineers who pass the Certified Kubernetes Administrator¬†(CKA) exam
  • Demonstrable activity in the Kubernetes community including active¬†contribution
  • A business model to support enterprise end users, including putting¬†engineers at a customer site

The CKA exam is about to enter early release beta testing prior to the public release in September. It is an online, proctored, performance-based test that requires solving multiple issues from a command line. It takes 3 to 4 hours to complete, and costs $300, though a discount is available for beta testers to $100.

If your company is interested in becoming a KCSP, please do the following 4 things:

  1. Ensure that your company is listed at https://kubernetes.io/partners/
    and if not (or if the listing should be updated), please do so via the link
    at the top of that page.
  2. Have 3 or more of your Kubernetes experts sign up for the beta test at:
    https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSd9-6nL5L3SzWIddCSPoKeuX_Pdq_KHI8C4mQzcUryP-gu0dQ/viewform
    .Please have them use their company email so we can properly associate
    them. Within a week, we will send beta test dates, a discount coupon code, and instructions to register and schedule.
  3. Register your interest in becoming a KCSP at this form: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfai-zlNuvP-q0fz3jw89v3v4m_wYaF7tOBmNY0WoKsZgeQUQ/viewform
  4. If you are not already on it, and want to track progress of the certification program over time, please subscribe to the Kubernetes Certification Working Group list: https://lists.cncf.io/mailman/listinfo/cncf-kubernetescertwg.

Questions or issues? Please email cncf-kcsp-support at lists.cncf.io

Thanks!

Cloud Native Computing Foundation and Kubernetes

Over the past few months I’ve been helping form an infrastructure focused open source foundation (from scratch) and acting as its interim Executive Director. I’m thrilled to announce that the Cloud Native Computing Foundation¬†(CNCF) has accepted its first project, Kubernetes:

There’s a ton of work to do still around developing and evolving development processes, but I’m happy to have our first project which will collaborate with us to establish and evolve these processes (along with the other projects that get accepted).

In the end, it’s really been an adventure in setting up this new open source foundation and I definitely need to write a blog post on some of the lessons learned so far about the experience. I’m really looking forward to see the CNCF become a cloud native commons home for many projects, move the cloud native computing paradigm forward and define what it means to be an open source foundation in the modern GitHub era.